YOUR RAFTER JUMPER IN ROYAL BLUE

It’s really important to me, that when you buy one of my products you feel 100% confident about its provenance. By being totally transparent on every single stage of production, I hope to connect you closely with what you’ve bought and encourage us all to ask more questions about the production journey for everything we buy.

WHAT YARN WAS USED?

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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ROYAL BLUE YARN

  • Created using the 2021 wool clip from the Portland sheep in my flock

  • Sheared in Cocksmoor field, on the Bruern Estate by Jason Cox of Gloucester Shear.

  • Delivered to the Natural Fibre Company on the 27th September 2021

  • Worsted spun into a 3-ply chunky yarn

  • GOTS certified organic dye process completed at either The Natural Fibre Company Cornwall
    or Paintbox Textiles in Yorkshire

  • Returned back to me on the 22nd February 2022

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LEMON YARN

  • Created using the 2021 wool clip from the Portland sheep in my flock

  • Sheared in Cocksmoor field, on the Bruern Estate by Jason Cox of Gloucester Shear.

  • Delivered to the Natural Fibre Company on the 27th September 2021

  • Worsted spun into a 3-ply chunky yarn

  • GOTS certified organic dye process completed at The Natural Fibre Company Cornwall

  • Returned back to me on the 22nd February 2022

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MOSS YARN

  • Created using the 2021 wool clip from the Portland sheep in my flock

  • Sheared in Cocksmoor field, on the Bruern Estate by Jason Cox of Gloucester Shear.

  • Delivered to the Natural Fibre Company on the 27th September 2021

  • Worsted spun into a 3-ply chunky yarn

  • GOTS certified organic dye process completed at The Natural Fibre Company Cornwall

  • Returned back to me on the 22nd February 2022

HOW WAS YOUR WOOLLEN MADE?

Techniques

The Rafter Jumper is made fully fashioned which means I shape each segment whilst knitting - so there is no wastage from off-cuts. I utilise the intarsia technique to create the large block patterns on the front - this is where you lay each individual row of knitting manually. It's an intensive but rewarding process, which takes a lot of time and requires careful hand finishing. Ribs are knitted for the cuffs, hem and neckline to create a soft textured finish.

Time

It takes me a minimum of 5 hours to knit the different sections of the Rafter jumper, and then at least 6 hours to steam each piece, sew in the ends and hand stitch the segments together. 

HOW CAN YOU CARE FOR YOUR WOOLLEN?

Airing is caring

Because of its odour, stain and crease-resistant properties wool can practically take care of itself. The best way to keep your knitwear fresh is to let it's natural properties do the work. Air and rest for 24 hours between wears and only wash when it's really necessary.

When it really is time to wash

  • Hand wash is the safest option. Just fill a clean sink/bath (depending on the size of the garment) with cold water and soak the garment for 15 minutes. After soaking rinse the garment with clean water once or twice to remove any soap from the fabric. You can then spin the water out in the machine on a slow 600 spin.

  • You can wash in a washing machine on a wool wash at 30 degrees and a slow spin at 600 - individual machine wool wash settings vary so check; as the yarn is not superwash it will felt if it is agitated and heated.

  • Using a non biological, bleach free wool wash detergent for a gentle clean and avoid using a fabric softener

  • Turn your wool clothes inside-out before washing

  • Dry flat to avoid over-stretching

  • Always dry away from any heat sources

  • Never tumble-dry woollens

Storing your woollens

  • Store folded in a cool, dry area - don't hang them

  • If packing away woollens during the summer, be sure to use vacuum packed storage bags to aid the prevention of moths

  • Lavender bags can be used to deter moths too

  • Wool naturally pills and they can easily be removed by hand. This should be done routinely after drying, or just prior to ironing.

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO WITH IT AT THE END OF IT'S LIFE?

Your jumper will enjoy a long happy life. Knitwear can be beautifully and creatively repaired with techniques such as darning. However, although it can last a lifetime, one the joys of natural fibres are they don't last forever. Made from 100% biodegradable materials and free from toxic chemicals, you can compost your jumper at the end of its useful life, and it will decompose releasing valuable nutrients into the soil.